Items 1 to 10 of 343 total

per page
Page:
  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3
  4. 4
  5. 5
Set Descending Direction

Celebrate safety this Halloween with our fire safety guide

Monday, 23 October 2017 10:23:27 Europe/London

Autumn has arrived and the leaves are falling from the trees which means that Halloween and trick or treating are just around the corner and it’s important that people remember fire safety at this enjoyable time of year! Lots of Halloween activities represent fire safety risks including flammable costumes, candles and fireworks as well as home-made lanterns made from pumpkins and other costumes, clothing and furniture all of which are fire risks.

Read More

0 Comments | Posted By BOB SMITH

Water Fire Extinguishers Blog

Friday, 2 June 2017 15:39:00 Europe/London

Water fire extinguishers offer protection against Class A fires. Class A fire risks are those containing combustible materials such as wood, cloth and materials, paper etc. Water fire extinguishers should NOT be used on electrical fires.

Where can water fire extinguishers be used?

Water fire extinguishers are most commonly used in offices, shops etc. As they are not suitable for use on electrical fires then you will normally find a water fire extinguishers paired together with a CO2 carbon dioxide fire extinguisher.

What is the difference between and ‘water’ and ‘water additive’ fire extinguishers?

Water fire extinguishers are those which just contain plain water with no extra items added to the water. Water additive fire extinguishers contain an additive that will offer enhanced firefighting capabilities. Water additive fire extinguishers are more expensive than standard water fire extinguishers due to the cost of the fire rating.

How do water fire extinguishers work? Water fire extinguishers work as they cool down a fire therefore meaning that the fire will go out. Are water fire extinguisher environmentally friendly?

Yes! Plain water fire extinguishers that do not have any additives are one of the most eco and environmentally friendly fire extinguishers as they are filled with nothing but pure water! This means that when the water fire extinguisher require test discharge and refill every five years then the water that needs to be disposed of from the extinguisher can simply be poured away.

What sizes of water fire extinguishers of you sell?

Here at Firemart we offer plain water fire extinguishers in 6ltr and 9ltr sizes. Simply put, the larger 9ltr water fire extinguisher holds more water and has a higher fire rating therefore it will extinguisher larger fires. For most offices and workplaces the 6ltr water fire extinguisher is the most popular size as it is smaller and easier to handle and lift.

Water additive fire extinguishers are sometimes call high performance water fire extinguisher because of their high fire-fighting capabilities. We sell them in two sizes: 3ltr and 6ltr. The 3ltr water additive high performance fire extinguisher is very small and compact offering the same fire rating as a standard 6ltr water fire extinguisher therefore meaning that it is very popular in small shops and convenience stores where space is at a premium.   When you order from Firemart you are guaranteed the very highest levels of service from our helpful and trustworthy staff as well as FREE SHIPPING on standard deliveries to UK mainland delivery addresses. We also offer a PRICE MATCH GUARANTEE to ensure that you get the very best value and our products all offer exceptional WARRANTIES and GUARANTEES. co2 fire extinguishers offers a wide range of great value fire extinguishers for every budget including a wide range of fire safety equipment including fire blankets as well as fire safety signage and fire extinguisher stands and a whole host of other fire and safety related products.Read More

0 Comments | Posted By B SMITH

Fire safety guide to carbon monoxide

Monday, 10 April 2017 15:51:16 Europe/London

Carbon monoxide (CO) is a gas that occurs when carbon-based materials (e.g. woods, oil, coal etc) does not burn properly. Poorly fitted and malfunctioning gas appliances and flues can also lead to carbon monoxide leaks. Carbon monoxide is tasteless, odourless and colourless and can be deadly to humans. Low-level exposure does not kill immediately but prolonged exposure can be deadly.

How can I keep myself safe from Carbon Monoxide?

  • Ensure that any work carried out on gas appliances is ONLY undertaken by a Gas Safe Registered Engineer
  • Never use a BBQ inside or move a BBQ that has been lit inside
  • Ensure that wood burners etc are properly extinguished before you retire for the evening.
  • Ensure that gas appliances are used in well-ventilated spaces and that they are regularly maintained by a Gas Safe Registered Engineer
  • Have carbon monoxide alarms in your property and ensure that they are tested regularly and that the batteries are also changed regularly. Here at Firemartwe sell a self-contained carbon monoxide detectorwith free P&P and that offers great value. Carbon monoxide detectors have an audible alarm which will sound the machine detects carbon monoxide present and this will give you and your loved ones a warning that carbon monoxide is present and time to evacuate the premises.Read More
  • 0 Comments | Posted By BOB SMITH

    Wet Chemical F-class fire extinguishers

    Friday, 31 March 2017 09:39:24 Europe/London

    wet chemical f-class fire extinguishers are the only fire extinguishers that are designed to fight kitchen or cooking oil fires. Most wet chemical fire extinguishers will fight three types of fire risk: Class A (combustible materials including plastic, wood, paper, cloths and materials), Class B (FLAMMABLE LIQUIDS such as paraffin, petrol, oil etc) and Class F These are fires involving cooking fats and oils. Wet chemical/f-class fire extinguishers are the ONLY types of fire extinguisher that will successfully extinguish a fire that involves cooking oils and fats.

    Where can wet chemical fire extinguishers be used and what sizes are available? Here at Firemart we offer three sizes of wet chemical free extinguishers: the small and compact 2ltr, medium 3ltr and larger 6ltr fire extinguisher.

    You can choose the size of the fire extinguisher based upon your needs. For example, a small 2ltr fire extinguisher would be ideal for a catering van or small kitchen whereas the larger 6ltr fire extinguisher would be more suited to a larger industrial kitchen.

    How will I recognise a wet chemical fire extinguisher? Wet chemical fire extinguishers all feature a usage label that will include a bright yellow strip which indicates the fire extinguisher type and usage.

    You will also want to include a wet chemical fire extinguisher id sign above the fire extinguisher.

    How do wet chemical fire extinguishers work?

    wet chemical f-class fire extinguishers release a foam when they are operated. The foam forms a layer over the top of the fire effectively sealing the fire and removing the oxygen from the fire. Without the oxygen, the fire is no longer able to burn and will be extinguished.

    Wet chemical fire extinguishers are often called ‘F’ class fire extinguishers and they have an ‘F’ class fire rating which is showing as a number followed by the letter F. The letter indicates that the fire extinguisher can be used on Class F (wet chemical fires). For example, the letter and number combination 75F means that the fire extinguisher is suitable for up to 75 litres of oil. The larger the number, the larger the fire that it will extinguish.Read More

    0 Comments | Posted By BOB SMITH

    Fire safety facts

    Thursday, 23 March 2017 09:53:05 Europe/London

    Fire Safety facts and figures In today’s world we are thrown facts and figures at an alarming rate but here are some fire safety facts and figures that are taken form the official Home Office Document ‘Fire Statistics England 2014/2016’, published in June 2016:
  • Around 496,000 fie related incident were attended to by fire and rescues services in England in 2014/2015. This is a significantly smaller figures than incident attended in 2003/2004 when the figure was around 1,016,000. Of the incident attended in 2014/2015, approximately 155,000 were fire-related and 31,300 were dwelling fire incidents.
  • 36% of deaths in accidental dwelling firs in 2014-2015 were caused by smokers’ materials. For every million people living in England there were 4.8 fire related fatalities in 2014-2015.
  • 46% of all fires in England in 2014-2015 occurred between 4pm and 10pm with the peak of fires being between 7pm and 8pm.
  • For fatalities caused by fire in England in 2014-2015, 41% of people were aged 65 and over.Read More
  • 0 Comments | Posted By BOB SMITH

    Fire Safety in the Workplace Blog

    Wednesday, 15 March 2017 09:49:30 Europe/London

    Fire safety in the workplace In England and Wales (there are different rules for Scotland), you will be responsible for fire safety in business and non-domestic premises if you are an employer, the business owner, the landlord, an occupier or someone else who controls premises such as a building or facilities manager. The legislation that governs fire safety in non-domestic premises is known as The Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order 2005. This is also applicable to places where there is sleeping accommodation for paying guests such as hotels and guesthouses etc.

    The person who is responsible for fire safety is known as the ‘responsible person’. As the responsible person you must:

  • carry out or ensure that a fire risk assessment is carried out for the premises and that this is written down. The fire risk assessment must be regularly reviewed
  • provide fire safety training to staff and give them fire safety information
  • have an emergency plan in place
  • put into place fire safety measures and ensure that they are maintained
  • inform staff and of the identified risks

    Non-domestic premises include all workplaces and commercial premises such as offices etc, any properties that the public have access to such as hotels etc., the common areas of residential buildings e.g. the staircases and hallways of shared blocks of flats etc.

    If there are several occupants of the same building then there may more than one person who is responsible for fire safety and all of the responsible persons must share fire safety information to ensure the safety of all building occupants and users.

    Fire safety plans, fire risk assessments and fire safety training should all be updated on a regular basis. If the premises are extended or changed or their usage changes then it may be necessary to review sooner than planned.Read More

  • 0 Comments | Posted By BOB SMITH

    Fire Safety Facts and Figures

    Friday, 10 February 2017 09:44:40 Europe/London

    Fire Safety facts and figures In today’s world we are thrown facts and figures at an alarming rate but here are some fire safety facts and figures that are taken form the official Home Office Document ‘Fire Statistics England 2014/2016’, published in June 2016:
  • Around 496,000 fie related incident were attended to by fire and rescues services in England in 2014/2015. This is a significantly smaller figures than incident attended in 2003/2004 when the figure was around 1,016,000. Of the incident attended in 2014/2015, approximately 155,000 were fire-related and 31,300 were dwelling fire incidents.
  • 36% of deaths in accidental dwelling firs in 2014-2015 were caused by smokers’ materials. For every million people living in England there were 4.8 fire related fatalities in 2014-2015.
  • 46% of all fires in England in 2014-2015 occurred between 4pm and 10pm with the peak of fires being between 7pm and 8pm.
  • For fatalities caused by fire in England in 2014-2015, 41% of people were aged 65 and over.Read More
  • 0 Comments | Posted By BOB SMITH

    Guide to candle fire safety

    Tuesday, 24 January 2017 09:56:03 Europe/London

    Candles are becoming an ever-increasing home accessory and without doubt they can add a nice ambiance to any room and home but they can also be dangerous and particular caution should be exercised when using candles. Particular care must be taken when children and pets are present in the home.Read More
    0 Comments | Posted By BOB SMITH

    Fire Safety Legislation Blog

    Monday, 16 January 2017 15:11:21 Europe/London

    In this new fire safety blog we will bring you information about the fire safety law that governs the United Kingdom. At the present time, England and Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland each have their own laws governing fire safety.

    Read More

    0 Comments | Posted By BOB SMITH

    Fire Safety Guidance in the Home Blog

    Wednesday, 11 January 2017 11:21:09 Europe/London

    Fire Safety in the home: creating an escape plan

    We always hope that the worst will never happen but it’s is worth having a fire safety escape plan in place for your home just in case. In this blog we offer some simple tips about how to put together a simple escape plan:

  • Make sure that everyone in your family is aware of the plan, including children, and that your plan includes all family members, bot forgetting any pets and four-legged friends!
  • Try and ensure that your keys (which you will need to open doors when you exit the premises) are stored in the same location so that every family members knows where they are and that they can be quickly and easily accessed if you need to exit your premises quickly.
  • Make sure that you have a pre-defined escape route in place and that this is easy to access and free from trip hazards etc (as far as possible!) You also need to think about how you will be able to exit if your escape route is blocked. In most houses, the escape route will include exiting via stairs but what happens if you cannot use the stairs? In these circumstances, you may wish to consider having fire escape ladders on the first floor of the property as these will help you to exit from upstairs windows.
  • If smoke is coming through a door, then putting clothing, towels etc at the bottom of the door can help to slow down the smoke that is coming in.Read More
  • 0 Comments | Posted By BOB SMITH

    Items 1 to 10 of 343 total

    per page
    Page:
    1. 1
    2. 2
    3. 3
    4. 4
    5. 5
    Set Descending Direction